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Well, what do you know: IT services grew last year

Market research firm Gartner figures that IT services spending reached $793 billion in 2010, which represents a 3.1 percent increase from 2009 numbers. While this certainly couldn’t be classified as a huge growth, it sure beats the 5.1 percent decline that was posted between 2008 and 2009.

Mind you, the IT services figures that Gartner studies are the ones for the mammoth IT services companies, including IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Fujitsu, Accenture, and CSC — among others. So, these numbers primarily refer to the enterprise and federal market. There really aren’t any surprises when it comes to share. These are the top 5 IT services firms, ranked by 2010 revenue share.

  1. IBM – $56.4 billion (7.1 percent share)
  2. HP – $35.4 billion (4.5 percent share)
  3. Fujitsu – $24.1 billion (3 percent share)
  4. Accenture – $22.2 billion (2.8 percent share)
  5. CSC $16.1 billion (2 percent share)

But here are some other tidbits that I found intriguing from a competitive standpoint:

  • HP had the weakest growth rate, eeking out just a 0.3 percent increase (a relatively “puny” $100 million) during 2010
  • Firms from India still are growing faster than the industry average; collectively, the posted growth of 18.9 percent, increasing their share to 5.5 percent of the market

The most active services areas? Software support, and consulting and development/integration serivces that were put on hold during the recession.

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2007 still works
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its really that if u have cheaper or free stuff, why pay? and u can also get the illegal version of it if u 1 2
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For better collaboration and integration with Office products and Job productivity
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As we move forward as an organization the integrated concept and support of the major operating systems with tools that we all ready use just make sense. Google Apps has never caught on with our organization.
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The reliability and usability trend in Microsoft Office product is very positive since version 2007.
And this last version seems even better in terms of both UI design and usability.
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Not finished with the 2010 upgrade as of yet.
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Other than replacing an older Office version that will be going out of support, what's the point of the upgrade if the rest of the PC and enterprise architecture is not ready to utilize the new features?
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too much of a hassle
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Too "bleeding edge"
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i need capacity for office 2013
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We are an ISV and need to be on the latest Microsoft software since our software integrates with it.
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Alternatives do not offer the same flexibility and the reason to up grade is to keep up with change.
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Because office 2003 is not broken, why replace something that is not broken, it works, why does Microsoft always release new version when the old is working fine
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i can't pay more money...
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We are currently on Office 2010 and the user base is quite satisified, besides that we finished migration to Windows 7/Office 2010 this spring.
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just completed upgrade to Office 2010, will wait for release after Office 2013
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Not cost effective
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No money and no need
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No need
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Non IT distrust of cloud-based SaaS (or anything that isn't owned) is an obstacle in many low-tech firms. Everybody wants "their copy" of software and data for that matter.
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Well if it is out in the fall we will be upgraded "BY" next year. If we have to use office 365 with the cloud we can't upgrade, as our organization prohibits storing anything in a cloud that has any portion outside the US.
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No. There is no need to upgrade just to upgrade.
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I will have to see if there are compelling reasons to make the change to Office 2013. So far I am not sure that those reasons exist.
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It entirely depends on the locally installed version price. I am not opposed to using cloud services, but my business requires the ability to use productivity software offline and some documents are in-house use only and do not leave the internal network at all. I prefer fat-client systems with locally installed applications in general. I also prefer to pay for a perpetual license and keep a copy of the software rather than SaaS.
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Our agreement with MS gives us access, and it will be easy to deploy with SCCM.
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there's no reason not to move forward
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There are to much cloud features inside
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As MS Partner we need to evaluate new product and advise our clients accordingly
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Looking at the synergies. We're a Win. 7 shop, won't be migrating to Win. 8 unless some other technology other than a complete set of new touch screen monitors becomes available. We also have Android/Apple mobile devices NOT Win. phone devices.
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Depends on impact to other applications
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Need more information
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Still rolling out Office 2007/2010, no compelling features in new release
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Education problem
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How many countries does its users knows more about the cloud talk less of using Microsoft 2013 on the cloud. it may be a little difficulties for most countries in Africa which has a high percentage of patronage on Microsoft applications
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IT folks, listen well, all the cloud is for your "Business Managers" is a way to get you out of the loop. IT as a service means your work and your customer data goes overseas. This may seem like a great strategy but it is doomed to fail for several reasons. One, yes you save in hardware and it staff costs, and yes the "up front cost" is less. Trouble is that most MBAs out there have the foresight of a mole! What happens 5 years down the road when your brighter folks have gone and your inhouse hardware is a rusting hulk? The "restart cost" of the IT function will be astoundign at that point. Outsourcing the entire IT function doesn't work anymor ethan outsourcing HR. (yes they try to do that and no it doesn't work). Making a "Quick Buck" is not the way to invest in the future. Infrastructure is the key to success. control of your Intellectual property and sensitive data are also crucial to success. Use your heads people, the cloud is not the solution. The time for options like "libreoffice" is here now. Microsoft is both unreliable and filled with errors, outages, and cost. Remember they are a business too. the idea is to take as much of your money as they can. this has been proven time and again. trouble with the "cloud" is after you get "hooked" you are stuck with nothing to fall back on.
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cost, unknown future of product, loss of market share, uncertainty of microsoft overall health.
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