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Microsoft Cloud OS Network: From hosting to managed services

Almost one year ago, Microsoft launched the Microsoft Cloud OS Network with 25 hosting service providers. Today, the number of hosting service providers has quadrupled to more than 100 worldwide with more than 600 local data centers. What that means is expanded opportunity for Microsoft’s cloud service provider ecosystem of more than 26,000 to deliver Azure-enabled cloud to their customers.

The Microsoft hosting providers offer solutions based on the Microsoft Cloud Platform, which consists of Windows Server with Hyper-V, System Center and Windows Azure Pack. Cloud service providers leverage Microsoft’s Cloud OS Network to offer customers cloud offerings including IaaS and Saas, often differentiating their services with their own intellectual property.

Some examples of the types of services offered are data center management automation, database as a service, private cloud delivered as a service, etc.

According to Marco Limena, vice president of hosting service providers at Microsoft, the company’s service providers are a key to its hosting provider strategy, its growth and Microsoft’s larger cloud vision.

“These 26,000 service providers have their own data centers and use Microsoft technology to build services that they offer to their end-user customers – these being small, [medium-sized] and enterprise customers,” he said.

The importance of the expanded footprint of data centers and localization is that for many companies across the world, compliance requirements and data sovereignty dictate, or in many cases limit, cloud implementations.

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Do you use nonpersistent or persistent desktops for VDI?
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Non-persistent pools have their place, but they add complexity to a service that is intended to replace a well-established and simple PC support model to achieve the level of personalization that users demand. For some use cases, the constraints of a shared pool and the engineering required to make it work just don't make sense. The costs of the data center VDI components such as storage have dropped to a cost that makes persistent desktops feasible.
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Developer desktops are persistent, training (etc) desktops are not
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We used both at the previous place of employment due to some of the specialty applications that required licensing such as Adobe pro.Those would be placed in the persistent vdi pool. I felt the management on those vm's was actually easier.
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We use persistent as most of our user are developer.
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We just started using vmware view but we eager to see a much cheaper technology.
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If a user requires the ability to install apps... let them do it on a laptop!

And the argument to use RDSh instead of non-persitent shows a real lack of understanding too!
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They cant do if they have Thin Clients :)
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Worlddesk vdi provides persistent desktops.
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Non persistent
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I am exploring the potential of VDI for our customer base (heavy CAD users). There have been a great deal of recent advancements toward better servicing this power-hungry user base.
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We tried nonpersistent "golden image" but it does not work well with all the speciality apps law firms need
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used to support the BYOD population having a persistent approach helps - due to the fact that you can personalise your desktop
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We use both types persistent as well as non-persistent as per our client needs.
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IT WILL BE BETTER IF- SUPPLY OF INFORMATION IS RESTRICTED TO USE BY GENERAL PUBLIC...(PLEASE)
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