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Got an IT job opening? Maybe you should take a chance on a vet

When I talk to solution providers about their biggest day-to-day operational challenges, hiring skilled technical personnel invariably comes up as urgent priority one or two. So it seemed appropriate to put on my patriotic cap for a moment on Veteran’s Day to mention a new program started by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) to prepare returning war veterans for jobs in the IT field.

The effort, called Creating Futures, links would-be employers with military personnel who are leaving active service and transitioning back into civilian life. It is, in its purest form, a training program intended to help these individuals develop the skills they need to potentially snag one of these jobs. The program provides a skills assessment, scholarship opportunities, technical training sessions, certification testing, internships and job search assistance.

CompTIA says it has been running a pilot program in Jacksonville, Fla., since March that has aided 47 veterans to date. The organization’s goal is to offer training for up to 200 people in this particular geographic area, with an eye to duplicating the program in other large cities that are home to large numbers of transitioning military personnel who are leaving active service and reentering the civilian job pool. CompTIA is also offering online training to active personnel stationed in Germany, and it is working with organizations, including Wounded Warriors, to identify IT job candidates.

Even if you’re not a CompTIA member, it seems reasonable for solution providers to look toward this candidate pool to address their hiring needs. Got any success stories or tips for how you’re successfully developing personnel? If you’re a solution provider with something to talk about, e-mail Tech Target contributing blogger Heather Clancy at hccollins@mac.com.

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What sort of testing are you using on your mobile apps?
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Because it is useful for testing
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Some companies fail at this. A local news outlet is prompting their app as "all devices all the time".. Yet I have e-mailed their "webmaster" numerous times that the app will not even load on my Samsung Galaxy tablet. Never got one response and problem still exists. I guess it's not important to their customer base.
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Good conversation and information about testing around mobile devices and apps.
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We are doing internal testing to find out most of the bugs specially critical bugs.
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Home-grown product for testing mobile apps. No crowd sourcing
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Internal testing on Android ICS.
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Bcz most company provide limitation version of mobile , its not possible test to cover more version ..
So main reason is device limitation in most of company
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Beta testing
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Quite an interesting topic to discuss. The insight presented here helps professionals like me to think on the flip side!
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internal testing bcoz no difference from web require special testing. however the testing is very limited bcoz it tests only on one type of mobiles (e.g, nokia, IPhone, BlackBerry,etc ...)
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Yes i do it more than other testing methods
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senior just have no intention to learn former testing, junior have to take it by themself
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Internal Testing/QA .I think, by using this sort we can test all of application components and its related to directly user funcitionality.
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I know there is a testing process within the SDLC, is this the testing you're talking about, or have you done user experience analysis testing? (UXP)
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It really helped to think that mobile testing is a kind of newer area to play
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You can think of mobile testing in 4 parts - unit, functional, data and UX testing. Good explanation: http://ow.ly/ltC0f
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We do formal internal testing/QA. Nevertheless, I see crowdsourcing as a valuable complement for some of our mobile projects.
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What sort of testing are you using on your mobile apps?
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We use QA and beta testing but integrating blitfeedback on our applications. You can cut 50% of testing time by using a service like this.
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hello,
Indeed it is nice post sometime many of the users may got confuse between these 2 ,they think both web app testing and mobile app testing are same .You have clearly mention the difference between these two.nice work done by you.

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The first big difference I see is a new set of failure modes - older OSes and products (for native apps), older browser for web app, various sizes, new problems with memory, connectivity, heat, and low power. Geo-aware and social-integrated apps also bring new challenges.

While the thinking processes are the same, and arguably the skills are the same, I can agree that a new sort of expertise is required. Luckily, testers can get that expertise relatively quickly by getting out there to test.
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