Data backup policies

Find out what to look for when helping customers update their data backup policies, in this podcast with storage expert George Crump.

 

 In this podcast with George Crump, founder and president of Storage Switzerland, find out the key factors that come into play in updating your customers' data backup policies. Read the transcript below or listen to the podcast.



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What are the typical data backup policies that most customers deploy?

Most customers tend to deploy some sort of a weekly rotation where they'll do a full backup at the end of the week and then during the week they'll do either an incremental or a differential. The difference [between the two is that] an incremental is what changed since last night's backup, and a differential is what changed since the last full backup. Occasionally a customer will do a full backup maybe once a quarter or even longer, but it's not very common.

What type of solutions can optimize my customer's data backup policy?

Again, a lot depends on the data backup policy they set, but if they're like most customers, they're doing a full backup once a week and either incrementals or differentials during the week, then they can really benefit by the use of a data deduplication type of system because so much of that backup data is redundant from day to day and week to week that they'll see a dramatic gain in the amount of data they can store on disk.

How do resellers know they should talk to their customers about changing their data backup policy?

The first thing is to look at what type of policy they have, as we discussed, and where the roots of that came from, and if you think it, most data backup policies came 15 or 20 years ago, to minimize the amount of tape media that would have to be inserted to recover a server. First of all, servers and storage have gotten substantially more reliable, certainly in the past 15 years, and most customers nowadays use some sort of a disk target as their first line of defense in the backup process. So the need to load additional pieces of media is very infrequent, and so as a result, we recommend that people lengthen the amount of time in between full backups.

What types of solutions allow a customer to change their data backup policy while increasing the quality of their protection?

There are a couple things you can do. First of all, look at technologies like block-level incremental backups or source-side data deduplication, as well as some of the continuous data protection strategies. So you're capturing data in a much more granular approach, you're not sending as much data across the network, and then you can move it off to backup disk or backup tape with less pressure.

This was last published in February 2009

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