Article

Conficker damage minimized; Ubuntu fights for data center cred

Barb Darrow
IT channel news for April 3, 2009

Conficker contained

The latest version of Conficker went live April 1, but the worm didn't do a lot of damage, according

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to SearchSecurity.com. The Conficker Working Group was credited for cracking the worm's domain algorithm and keeping widespread infection at bay.

The worm exploits a Microsoft remote procedure call vulnerability, which the company patched last October. The number of machines infected worldwide remains in dispute. F-Secure Corp. estimates that 10 million machines were hit as of January, while others say that three million is a more realistic number.

Security researchers at Honeynet Project and IBM have been looking at ways to detect and destroy the worm. Last week, IBM released a scan that detects network anomalies caused by the worm and traces them back to a machine's network address. "This is a passive scan. Our researchers have found a way to crack the code and pick up peer-to-peer chatter on networks," said Holly Stewart, the threat response manager for IBM X-Force.

Ubuntu still pushing for data center share

Ubuntu has yet to replicate its desktop popularity in data center servers, according to a recent Ubuntu global user survey. Results show nearly a third of the respondents work for companies with 10 or fewer employees and only 28% work in the U.S. (compared to 55% from Europe), according to SearchDataCenter.com. And the overwhelming majority are using Ubuntu for basic Web, print and file, database and backup server functions, with a small minority using it for advanced tasks, like virtualization or cluster computing, according to SearchEnterpriseLinux.com. The low usage numbers for advanced jobs mirror the findings for Linux as a whole in a TechTarget data center survey that was conducted last year. The most prevalent Ubuntu industry sectors were in technology and education.

NetSuite sleeping with the enemy

This week, NetSuite released a set of packaged, on-demand integrations between NetSuite's Software as a Service (SaaS) applications and rival Salesforce.com's applications. "This is the coming together of the two leading business clouds," Raghu Gnanasekaran, senior director of business development with NetSuite's SuiteCloud Developer Program, told SearchCRM.com. NetSuite has taken shots at Salesforce.com, but this move acknowledges Salesforce.com's significant lead in CRM, according to SearchCRM.com.

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